Parents And Homework

6 Signs Your Child Needs a Tutor

When is it time to look for outside help? Watch out for these factors, which will determine whether your kid needs a tutor.

6 Ways to Find a Tutor

If you don't know where to start finding a tutor for your child, these six steps will help you find one-on-one help.

So Much Homework, So Little Time

With teachers handing out more assignments than ever, our kids are stressed, sleep deprived and, worst of all, becoming disillusioned with learning. But many frustrated parents are fighting back -- and winning. You can too.

How to Help Kids With Homework (Without Doing It for Them!)

When your kid says she can't solve a math problem or spell a tricky word without your help, don't fall for it. We've got a lesson plan to make her DIH.

12 Products to Make Homework More Fun

Getting the job done is about to become a lot more fun (and less like pulling teeth). The kids will love these new perfect-for-home school supplies so much that they'll jump to do those worksheets.

Homework Hassles

After a full day at school, the last thing your child probably wants to do is writing or math. Here's how to help him focus and finish.

Motivate Kids to Do Better in School

Is your kid struggling to put effort into school? Get advice on how to be his biggest cheerleader to inspire him to do well.

Homework Ruins Everything

Evenings look different once kindergarten hits.

7 Ways to Establish Good Homework Habits

Help your child get the most out of homework assignments with these tips.

Help Your Kid Be a Better Speller

Or should we say, a better S-P-E-L-L-E-R?

Developing Good Homework Habits

These six tips will show how to get your kids on track with their schoolwork and lay the foundation for good study habits.

How to Catch Up on Homework

If your child misses school because of sick days, learn about the steps that will help him make up homework past and present in no time.

How Parents Can Help Kids With Homework

If the thought of helping your child with his afterschool assignments makes you nervous, we have the tips to help you tackle tough topics.

The Homework Blues

If getting your child to complete assignments is a daily battle, we'll help you evaluate whether her workload is appropriate--and ease the ordeal of getting it done.

DIY Homework Pop-Up Station

Turn an old cardboard box into the perfect portable study station for your child.

The Reason This Teacher Adopted a No-Homework Policy May Surprise You

Wait; homework isn't helping our kids do better in school? Then, um, why are they doing so much of it?!

Making Strides Toward Independence

When my 10-year-old asked if she could start walking the three blocks to school on her own, I thought it was time to let her. But first, I had to teach her to cross the street.

Finally! The Perfect Wine Pairings to Get You Through Your Kids' Homework

The Holderness Family is back with homework wine pairings and we will totally drink to that!

76 Percent of Parents Say Their Kid Is Under Too Much Stress From School

New research reveals some startling stats about how parents feel when it comes to their kid's academic workload.

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Wondering how to help your children with homework — or how to get them to do it without a struggle? Here’s how.

What’s the point of homework? “Homework is designed to help students reinforce key concepts, process and solidify new information, provide time for extra practice of skills, and reflect on how much they’ve learned,” notes teacher Susan Becker, M. Ed. However, approaches to homework vary from district to district, school to school and teacher to teacher. Some schools don’t give children homework until the 2nd grade, others start in kindergarten. Some teachers create original homework, while other use or modify prepared work sheets.

Don’t do the homework for your child. Most teachers use homework to find out what the child knows. They do not want parents doing their children’s homework but do want parents to make sure homework is completed and review any mistakes to see what can be learned from them.

Don’t take over your child’s projects. Teachers do not want parents doing their kids’ projects. Instead, they want parents to support their kids’ learning and make sure they have what they need to accomplish a task. Check with your child’s teacher for his policy and review it with your child.
Set up a good space to work. All children need the same thing: a clean, well-lit space. But keep in mind that each child may work differently; some will do their work at the kitchen table and others at their desks in their rooms.

Pay attention to your child’s rhythms and help him find the right time to begin his work. Some children will work best by doing homework right after school; others need a longer break and must run around before tackling the work. Most will need a snack. If your child does after-school activities, set a homework time before or after the activity, or after dinner. Whatever routine you choose, help your child stick to it.

Find out how your child studies best. “You should find the ways your child likes to study. For example, some kids will learn spelling words by writing them out, others by closing their eyes and picturing them and saying them aloud,” advises teacher Susan Becker, M. Ed. “The sound environment is also important,” adds Michael Thompson, Ph.D. “Some kids may want to listen to music, some are helped by being in the middle of noise, others need absolute quiet.”

Don’t hover — but stay close by. Keep in mind that it’s their homework, not yours, but remain available in case you are needed. “The ideal set up would be for a parent to be reading nearby while the child is studying because then you both are doing your educational work together, but that’s not always possible,” says Michael Thompson, Ph.D. “A parent may be working out of the home, or need to be working in the home and cooking dinner. So if you are home, stay close, and if you are not there, have another adult check to make sure it’s going OK. And remember that all homework is not equal, so not everything will need your rapt attention.”

Limit media exposure. Turn off the TV and the iPod when your child does homework. And the computer too, unless it’s being used for research. You might start by asking how much time he thinks he should spend on this, and negotiate from there. Remember, you have the final word. And keep in mind that if you watch TV when your child can’t, the plan may backfire.

Let the teacher know if you gave your child a lot of homework help. “If your child needs extra help or truly doesn’t understand something, let the teacher know. Write on the assignment, ‘done with parental help,’ or write a separate note,” advises Michael Thompson, Ph.D. If your child resists, explain that homework is used to practice what you know and to show the teacher what you need help learning more about — so it’s a parent’s job to let the teacher know.

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