American Seat Assignment

November 26, 2013 (CHICAGO) --

You may be booking that holiday flight as we speak. But here's a surprise: even on the major airlines, you may not get an assigned seat. Eyewitness News uncovered the new trend that's giving some customers airline anxiety.

Some passengers say they buy a ticket, but there are no economy seats to be found. The only seats they can choose are the ones that cost more, with more leg room. Here's what you should do if this happens to you.

You know the drill. Most flights now are "completely full." There are fewer flights and in some cases, seats have gotten smaller. But now, a new challenge: simply securing your assigned, standard seat at no additional charge.

"They'll take my $600, I will assume there is a seat for me, so I don't know until I get to the airport, so I am wondering the whole time if I have a seat or not," said Carol McCarthy, passenger.

Carol McCarthy is an experienced business traveler. She and airline analysts say this is what's happening-- depending on the popularity of the flight, the seat map may not let you pick a coach seat at the time of purchase. But it will let you upgrade to a "preferred seat" or an "economy plus" seat with extra room. That can cost anywhere from $30-60.

"So it all comes back again to fees and increased fees for customers," said Beth Mosher, AAA.

We watched as American Airlines passenger Angie Tallarita worried.

"When I bought a regular seat it wasn't showing available," said Tallarita.

She didn't have an assigned seat until she checked in.

"It's annoying to buy a ticket and not know. I am going up to the counter to see if I have a seat but I don't really know. (If you will or not?) Pretty much," said Tallarita.

Some airlines like Southwest Airlines never assign seats but customers booking on most major airlines like delta, US Airways, American and United do expect to have a specific seat, when they buy their flight. If you don't, you can keep trying.

Airline experts say if you get to the airport and you still don't have a standard assigned seat, you can probably still get one at the kiosks, or by going to the gate and asking an employee. Experts also say you should never feel pressured into upgrading to one of those seats with more leg room.

"The upgrades are their choice and people need to remember that," said Mosher.

"Don't feel like you have to purchase those. If you purchased an economy seat, the airline will put you in a seat whether it's economy or ones with more legroom when it's time to get on the flight," said Jeanenne Tornatore, Orbitz.

The senior editor at Orbitz and a AAA spokesperson both say if the airline still can't give you your coach seat at the gate, they should upgrade you at no cost.

Chicago's United Airlines and American Airlines wouldn't go on camera, but said gate agents work to provide seats for all ticketed passengers.

A United spokesperson added that if you can't pick the seat on the map at the time of booking, then it's not open. But customer Carol McCarthy is skeptical.

"I think it's because they want me to upgrade and spend more money," said McCarthy.

And if that's not enough, some airlines are also now charging for aisle and window seats. All of this is making travel even more frustrating for families who want to sit together. The best way to avoid the seat assignment hassle: book your flights early and find "off peak" times to travel.


American Airlines Assigned Seating


American Airlines Assigned Seating

My (new) husband and I are going to Hawaii for our honeymoon and have 2 flights each way. We booked through Expedia so we didn't get to choose our seats upon purchasing the tickets and now I'm looking on AA.com and only the preferred and main cabin extra seats are available for purchase. I called AA to try to play the honeymoon card to see if they could hook me up, but that didn't work and I was told that unless we purchased the seats there was no guarantee we could sit together but maybe the agent at check in could help. I don't really want to shell out another couple of hundred dollars but I don't want to risk not sitting together and waiting for check in. How likely is it that 2 seats will open up together? Is it worth the risk in waiting?
 
 
Jul 29, 17, 2:28 pm
Moderator: Delta SkyMiles, Luxury Hotels and TravelBuzz!
 
Welcome to Flyertalk, PAUJAU and congratulations on your marriage.
I am moving your topic to the American Airlines Forum. Please follow there
Thanks,
Obscure2k
TravelBuzz Moderator
 
Jul 29, 17, 3:26 pm
 
Congrats and welcome to FT!

If you check in at the 24-hour mark, there's a decent chance you'll at least get two seats in the same row (window+aisle most likely). Then, whoever's in the middle seat would almost certainly be happy to switch. Another option is to ask at the airport -- some seats are blocked for selection and only available once the flight is under airport control, so a check-in or gate agent might be able to seat you together.

That said, as the phone agent noted, the only way to essentially guarantee that you'll sit together is to pay for seat reservations in advance.
Originally Posted by PAUJAU
My (new) husband and I are going to Hawaii for our honeymoon and have 2 flights each way. We booked through Expedia so we didn't get to choose our seats upon purchasing the tickets and now I'm looking on AA.com and only the preferred and main cabin extra seats are available for purchase. I called AA to try to play the honeymoon card to see if they could hook me up, but that didn't work and I was told that unless we purchased the seats there was no guarantee we could sit together but maybe the agent at check in could help. I don't really want to shell out another couple of hundred dollars but I don't want to risk not sitting together and waiting for check in. How likely is it that 2 seats will open up together? Is it worth the risk in waiting?
 
Jul 29, 17, 3:33 pm
 
Programs: flybe avios, BAEC blue
Flown back from Auckland to Heathrow but via LAX on AA. Moved my flight forward to about 20 days from the time of moving. Only MCE available bar one or two middle seats, really wanted a window seat. After checking the seat map twice a day for ages, about 7 days before departure heaps of seats opened up. I'd just keep checking.
 
Jul 29, 17, 4:10 pm
 
Jul 29, 17, 11:26 pm
It should work out for you

I fly AA often and I find passengers (and myself) are pretty accommodating once you've boarded the flight

I wouldnt pay the additional money either.

1) Arrive early and ask for different seats. If this fails or they have already gone to "gate control" ask again at the gate

2) Ask fellow travellers to move who tend to be rather accommodating, especially if you have something to offer-aisle for aisle, window for window etc. Im not sure what you have but you would be better off selecting 2 aisle seats or an aisle and a window or 2 window seats in nearby rows, then anyone with a center seat will gladly swap you. Should work like a charm
 
Location: Naples, Florida
Programs: AA Lifetime Gold, Hyatt Platinum,Marriott Silver,Hilton Honors Gold
Somewhere between 24-25 hours out of flight a fair number of seats will open up.
 
Jul 30, 17, 2:48 pm
A FlyerTalk Posting Legend
 
Programs: AA Gold 1MM, AS MVP, Marriott LT Gold, HH Diamond
This.

Actually, I'd probably check AA.com often in the days leading up to the flight.

Main thing is to get yourselves any two non-middle seats you can. Then, you can offer it to the person in the middle next to one of you. If they are traveling solo, they'll be happy to take your aisle/window.

But even if they don't want to switch, you're still on the same plane and you're heading to Hawaii, where you will arrive at (approximately) the same time.

I wouldn't pay anything for a "preferred" seat on AA. I might consider paying for MCE, depending on the price and whether two nice ones are together. I'm AA Gold, so I just gamble on MCE availability at check-in. Sometimes I get it; sometimes I don't.
Originally Posted by worldspan
Somewhere between 24-25 hours out of flight a fair number of seats will open up.
 
Jul 31, 17, 11:57 am
 
Depending on your routing and dates of travel I would be skeptical of a seat trade since these are heavy tourist routes (families and couples) and not many solo travelers. Unlikely seats will open up until the 24 hour mark. Any weight listed upgrades processed will likely be elites coming from preferred seats.
 
Jul 31, 17, 12:14 pm
 
Programs: AA EXP, National Executive Elite, Hilton Diamond


Why burden another customer with your seat request? Sorry, but it's not my concern that another passenger was too cheap to pay for assigned preferred seating in advance.

Aloha
Originally Posted by HelpAppreciated
Ask fellow travellers to move who tend to be rather accommodating, especially if you have something to offer-aisle for aisle, window for window etc. Im not sure what you have but you would be better off selecting 2 aisle seats or an aisle and a window or 2 window seats in nearby rows, then anyone with a center seat will gladly swap you. Should work like a charm
 
Jul 31, 17, 12:21 pm
 
Programs: AA EXP, National Executive Elite, Hilton Diamond
When I'm politely asked to move to keep a family together I will of course move assuming it's equal or better seat. When it comes to situations where a husband and wife want to sit together and in this case something as special as a honeymoon for God's sake why risk it and burden another customer. If being together is that important to you, then OPEN your wallet.

That's all I'm saying.
Originally Posted by rickg523
No harm in asking though. They might come across someone more like me, who when traveling solo almost always moves for couple. or families. "Almost" means I'm not moving to a middle seat in the last row between two COS, but any reasonable request, put politely, will be considered.
 
Jul 31, 17, 12:36 pm
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